The Naturalist

Filename: the-naturalist.pdf
ISBN: 9780307464323
Release Date: 2016-04-12
Number of pages: 352
Author: Darrin Lunde
Publisher: Crown

Download and read online The Naturalist in PDF and EPUB A captivating new account of how Theodore Roosevelt’s lifelong passion for the natural world set the stage for America’s wildlife conservation movement and determined his legacy as a founding father of today’s museum naturalism No U.S. president is more popularly associated with nature and wildlife than is Theodore Roosevelt—prodigious hunter, tireless adventurer, and ardent conservationist. We think of him as a larger-than-life original, yet in The Naturalist, Darrin Lunde has firmly situated Roosevelt’s indomitable curiosity about the natural world in the tradition of museum naturalism. As a child, Roosevelt actively modeled himself on the men (including John James Audubon and Spencer F. Baird) who pioneered this key branch of biology by developing a taxonomy of the natural world—basing their work on the experiential study of nature. The impact that these scientists and their trailblazing methods had on Roosevelt shaped not only his audacious personality but his entire career, informing his work as a statesman and ultimately affecting generations of Americans’ relationship to this country’s wilderness. Drawing on Roosevelt’s diaries and travel journals as well as Lunde’s own role as a leading figure in museum naturalism today, The Naturalist reads Roosevelt through the lens of his love for nature. From his teenage collections of birds and small mammals to his time at Harvard and political rise, Roosevelt’s fascination with wildlife and exploration culminated in his triumphant expedition to Africa, a trip which he himself considered to be the apex of his varied life. With narrative verve, Lunde brings his singular experience to bear on our twenty-sixth president’s life and constructs a perceptively researched and insightful history that tracks Roosevelt’s maturation from exuberant boyhood hunter to vital champion of serious scientific inquiry. From the Hardcover edition.


Thenaturalist

Filename: thenaturalist.pdf
ISBN: 9780307464316
Release Date: 2017-04-11
Number of pages: 352
Author: Darrin Lunde
Publisher: Broadway Books

Download and read online Thenaturalist in PDF and EPUB "No U.S. president is more popularly associated with nature and wildlife than Theodore Roosevelt-prodigious hunter, tireless adventurer, and ardent conservationist. We think of him as a larger-than-life original, yet in The Naturalist, Darrin Lunde has located Roosevelt in the proud tradition of museum naturalism. From his earliest days, Roosevelt actively modeled himself on the men who pioneered a key branch of biology through the collection of animal specimens and by developing a taxonomy of the natural world. The influence they would have on Roosevelt shaped not only his audacious personality but also his career, informing his work as a statesman and ultimately affecting generations of Americans' relationships to this country's wilderness. Drawing on Roosevelt's diaries and expedition journals, and pulling from his own experience as a leading figure in today's museum naturalism, Lunde constructs a thoughtfully researched, singularly insightful history that tracks Roosevelt's maturation from exuberant boyhood hunter to vital champion of serious scientific inquiry."


The Naturalist

Filename: the-naturalist.pdf
ISBN: 9780307464309
Release Date: 2016-04
Number of pages: 352
Author: Darrin Lunde
Publisher: Crown Publishing Group (NY)

Download and read online The Naturalist in PDF and EPUB "The surprising story of intrepid naturalist Theodore Roosevelt and how his lifelong passion for the natural world set the stage for America's wildlife conservation movement. a Perhaps no American president is more associated with nature and wildlife than Theodore Roosevelt, a prodigious hunter and adventurer and an ardent conservationist. We think of Roosevelt as an original, yet in The Naturalist, Darrin Lunde shows how from his earliest days Roosevelt actively modeled himself in the proud tradition of museum naturalistsuthe men who pioneered a key branch of American biology through their desire to collect animal specimens and develop a taxonomy of the natural world. The influence these men would have on Roosevelt would shape not just his personality but his career, informing his work as a politician and statesman and ultimately affecting generations of Americans' relationship to this country's wilderness. Pulling from vast source material, including Roosevelt's diaries, expedition journals, and new findings from the archives of the Smithsonian, Lunde constructs a brilliantly researched, singularly insightful history that reveals the roots of Roosevelt's endu


Theodore Roosevelt in the Field

Filename: theodore-roosevelt-in-the-field.pdf
ISBN: 9780226298375
Release Date: 2015-11-16
Number of pages: 472
Author: Michael R. Canfield
Publisher: University of Chicago Press

Download and read online Theodore Roosevelt in the Field in PDF and EPUB Theodore Roosevelt first set foot into the field as a very young man, started a natural history museum at 8 years old, and reveled in expeditions in the field throughout his life. His adventures defined him--his policies and his persona--and are wonderfully chronicled in his journals and notebooks. TR's constant quest and passion for the outdoors influenced his experiences from the Spanish American War, to negotiations with Cuba, to hikes through Yellowstone with John Muir. Michael Canfield uses the notebooks to illuminate the force of nature in TR's life. He isolates the elements that drove Roosevelt-- his love of science and nature, his need to express manliness, his drive for empire--all of which share a common thru line, that of a propelling wish to act these out in the field. The outdoors to Roosevelt was like a perfect field jacket, which had a specific purpose, and yet which he donned for many pursuits--hunting, fishing, hiking, natural history study. This work invites readers to join TR on his adventures, with Canfield as a guide, and in the pages of his writings unearth a better understanding of what drove one of history's most remarkable characters.


Theodore Roosevelt and the Making of American Leadership

Filename: theodore-roosevelt-and-the-making-of-american-leadership.pdf
ISBN: 9781510701304
Release Date: 2015-10-27
Number of pages: 512
Author: Jon Knokey
Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing, Inc.

Download and read online Theodore Roosevelt and the Making of American Leadership in PDF and EPUB The epic story of how one man shaped events, people, and himself to forever change a country. President Theodore Roosevelt forever transformed America, ushering the country into the arena of world supremacy. His brand of leadership is entirely American: confident, compassionate, energetic, diverse, visionary. But Roosevelt was not a born leader; his ascent to the apex of power was not a foregone conclusion. He made himself a leader of consequence and it is his epic journey to the White House—a road filled with terrific failures, intimate introspection, and self-made luck—will inspire readers anew. While a graduate student at Harvard, author Jon Knokey, a Roosevelt historian and business leader, unearthed hundreds of unpublished letters and interview notes from Roosevelt contemporaries. These long-forgotten documents provide a fresh and stunning ringside seat along the 26th President’s journey to 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. The stories from Harvard chaps, idealistic political reformers, coarse cowboys from the Badlands, and rough and tumble Rough Riders from the nation’s interior, all combine to illuminate the maturation process of a man learning to lead at every stage of his life. Fast paced and written as a biographical narrative, Theodore Roosevelt and the Making of American Leadership places the reader alongside a young Theodore Roosevelt as he learns what he stands for and how he will lead. Skyhorse Publishing, as well as our Arcade imprint, are proud to publish a broad range of books for readers interested in history--books about World War II, the Third Reich, Hitler and his henchmen, the JFK assassination, conspiracies, the American Civil War, the American Revolution, gladiators, Vikings, ancient Rome, medieval times, the old West, and much more. While not every title we publish becomes a New York Times bestseller or a national bestseller, we are committed to books on subjects that are sometimes overlooked and to authors whose work might not otherwise find a home.


Rightful Heritage

Filename: rightful-heritage.pdf
ISBN: 0062089250
Release Date: 2017-03-14
Number of pages: 784
Author: Douglas Brinkley
Publisher: Harper Perennial

Download and read online Rightful Heritage in PDF and EPUB The acclaimed, award-winning historian—“America’s new past master” (Chicago Tribune)—examines the environmental legacy of FDR and the New Deal. Douglas Brinkley’s The Wilderness Warrior celebrated Theodore Roosevelt’s spirit of outdoor exploration and bold vision to protect 234 million acres of wild America. Now, in Rightful Heritage, Brinkley turns his attention to the other indefatigable environmental leader—Teddy’s distant cousin, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, chronicling his essential yet under-sung legacy as the founder of the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) and premier protector of America’s public lands. FDR built from scratch dozens of State Park systems and scenic roadways. Pristine landscapes such as the Great Smokies, the Everglades, Joshua Tree, the Olympics, Big Bend, Channel Islands, Mammoth Cave, and the slickrock wilderness of Utah were forever saved by his leadership. Brinkley traces FDR’s love for the natural world from his youth exploring the Hudson River Valley and bird watching. As America’s president from 1933 to 1945, Roosevelt—consummate political strategist—established hundreds of federal migratory bird refuges and spearheaded the modern endangered species movement. He brilliantly positioned his conservation goals as economic policy to combat the severe unemployment of the Great Depression. During its nine-year existence, the CCC put nearly three million young men to work on conservation projects—including building trails in the national parks, pollution control, land restoration to combat the Dust Bowl, and planting over two billion trees. Rightful Heritage is an epic chronicle that is both an irresistible portrait of FDR’s unrivaled passion and drive, and an indispensable analysis that skillfully illuminates the tension between business and nature—exploiting our natural resources and conserving them. Within the narrative are brilliant capsule biographies of such environmental warriors as Eleanor Roosevelt, Harold Ickes, and Rosalie Edge. Rightful Heritage is essential reading for everyone seeking to preserve our treasured landscapes as an American birthright.


The Wilderness Warrior

Filename: the-wilderness-warrior.pdf
ISBN: 0061940577
Release Date: 2009-07-28
Number of pages: 960
Author: Douglas Brinkley
Publisher: Harper Collins

Download and read online The Wilderness Warrior in PDF and EPUB From New York Times bestselling historian Douglas Brinkley comes a sweeping historical narrative and eye-opening look at the pioneering environmental policies of President Theodore Roosevelt, avid bird-watcher, naturalist, and the founding father of America’s conservation movement. In this groundbreaking epic biography, Douglas Brinkley draws on never-before-published materials to examine the life and achievements of our “naturalist president.” By setting aside more than 230 million acres of wild America for posterity between 1901 and 1909, Theodore Roosevelt made conservation a universal endeavor. This crusade for the American wilderness was perhaps the greatest U.S. presidential initiative between the Civil War and World War I. Roosevelt’s most important legacies led to the creation of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and passage of the Antiquities Act in 1906. His executive orders saved such treasures as Devils Tower, the Grand Canyon, and the Petrified Forest.


The Hour of Land

Filename: the-hour-of-land.pdf
ISBN: 9780374712266
Release Date: 2016-05-31
Number of pages: 416
Author: Terry Tempest Williams
Publisher: Sarah Crichton Books

Download and read online The Hour of Land in PDF and EPUB America’s national parks are breathing spaces in a world in which such spaces are steadily disappearing, which is why more than 300 million people visit the parks each year. Now Terry Tempest Williams, the author of the environmental classic Refuge and the beloved memoir When Women Were Birds, returns with The Hour of Land, a literary celebration of our national parks, an exploration of what they mean to us and what we mean to them. From the Grand Tetons in Wyoming to Acadia in Maine to Big Bend in Texas and more, Williams creates a series of lyrical portraits that illuminate the unique grandeur of each place while delving into what it means to shape a landscape with its own evolutionary history into something of our own making. Part memoir, part natural history, and part social critique, The Hour of Land is a meditation and a manifesto on why wild lands matter to the soul of America.


Probabilistic Mechanics of Quasibrittle Structures

Filename: probabilistic-mechanics-of-quasibrittle-structures.pdf
ISBN: 9781107151703
Release Date: 2017-05-25
Number of pages: 316
Author: Zdenek P. Bazant
Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Download and read online Probabilistic Mechanics of Quasibrittle Structures in PDF and EPUB This book presents an experimentally validated probabilistic strength theory of structures made of concrete, composites, ceramics and other quasibrittle materials.


Gaining Ground

Filename: gaining-ground.pdf
ISBN: 9780762794386
Release Date: 2013-05-21
Number of pages: 336
Author: Forrest Pritchard
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

Download and read online Gaining Ground in PDF and EPUB One fateful day in 1996, upon discovering that five freight cars’ worth of glittering corn have reaped a tiny profit of $18.16, young Forrest Pritchard undertakes to save his family’s farm. What ensues—through hilarious encounters with all manner of livestock and colorful local characters—is a crash course in sustainable agriculture. Pritchard’s biggest ally is his renegade father, who initially questions his career choice and eschews organic foods for sugary mainstream fare; but just when the farm starts to turn heads at local markets, his father’s health takes a turn for the worse.With poetry and humor, this timely memoir tugs on the heartstrings and feeds the soul long after the last page is turned.


Curators

Filename: curators.pdf
ISBN: 9780226389431
Release Date: 2017-03-21
Number of pages: 432
Author: Lance Grande
Publisher: University of Chicago Press

Download and read online Curators in PDF and EPUB Over the centuries, natural history museums have evolved from being little more than musty repositories of stuffed animals and pinned bugs, to being crucial generators of new scientific knowledge. They have also become vibrant educational centers, full of engaging exhibits that share those discoveries with students and an enthusiastic general public. At the heart of it all from the very start have been curators. Yet after three decades as a natural history curator, Lance Grande found that he still had to explain to people what he does. This book is the answer—and, oh, what an answer it is: lively, exciting, up-to-date, it offers a portrait of curators and their research like none we’ve seen, one that conveys the intellectual excitement and the educational and social value of curation. Grande uses the personal story of his own career—most of it spent at Chicago’s storied Field Museum—to structure his account as he explores the value of research and collections, the importance of public engagement, changing ecological and ethical considerations, and the impact of rapidly improving technology. Throughout, we are guided by Grande’s keen sense of mission, of a job where the why is always as important as the what. This beautifully written and richly illustrated book is a clear-eyed but loving account of natural history museums, their curators, and their ever-expanding roles in the twenty-first century.


My Lost Brothers

Filename: my-lost-brothers.pdf
ISBN: 1410492281
Release Date: 2016-08-03
Number of pages: 365
Author: Brendan McDonough
Publisher: Thorndike Press Large Print

Download and read online My Lost Brothers in PDF and EPUB A gripping first-person account by the sole survivor of Arizona's disastrous 2013 Yarnell Hill Fire, which took the lives of 19 "hotshots"--firefighters trained specifically to battle wildfires. Brendan McDonough was on the verge of becoming a hopeless, inveterate heroin addict when he, for the sake of his young daughter, decided to turn his life around. He enlisted in the Granite Mountain Hotshots, a team of elite firefighters based in Prescott, Arizona. Their leader, Eric Marsh, was in a desperate crunch after four hotshots left the unit, and perhaps seeing a glimmer of promise in the skinny would-be recruit, he took a chance on the unlikely McDonough, and the chance paid off. Despite the crew's skepticism, and thanks in large part to Marsh's firm but loving encouragement, McDonough unlocked a latent drive and dedication, going on to successfully battle a number of blazes and eventually win the confidence of the men he came to call his brothers. Then, on June 30, 2013, while McDonough--"Donut" as he'd been dubbed by his team--served as lookout, they confronted a freak, 3,000-degree inferno in nearby Yarnell, Arizona. The relentless firestorm ultimately trapped his hotshot brothers, tragically killing all 19 of them within minutes. Nationwide, it was the greatest loss of firefighter lives since the 9/11 attacks. "My Lost Brothers" is a gripping memoir that traces McDonough's story of finding his way out of the dead end of drugs, finding his purpose among the Granite Mountain Hotshots, and the minute-by-minute account of the fateful day he lost the very men who had saved him. A harrowing and redemptive story of resilience in the face of tragedy, "My Lost Brothers" is also a powerful reminder of the heroism of the people who put themselves in harm's way to protect us every day.


The Fly Trap

Filename: the-fly-trap.pdf
ISBN: 9781101870167
Release Date: 2015-06-02
Number of pages: 160
Author: Fredrik Sjöberg
Publisher: Vintage

Download and read online The Fly Trap in PDF and EPUB A Nature Book of the Year (The Times (UK)) “The hoverflies are only props. No, not only, but to some extent. Here and there, my story is about something else.” A mesmerizing memoir of extraordinary brilliance by an entomologist, The Fly Trap chronicles Fredrik Sjöberg’s life collecting hoverflies on a remote island in Sweden. Warm and humorous, self-deprecating and contemplative, and a major best seller in its native country, The Fly Trap is a meditation on the unexpected beauty of small things and an exploration of the history of entomology itself. What drives the obsessive curiosity of collectors to catalog their finds? What is the importance of the hoverfly? As confounded by his unusual vocation as anyone, Sjöberg reflects on a range of ideas—the passage of time, art, lost loves—drawing on sources as disparate as D. H. Lawrence and the fascinating and nearly forgotten naturalist René Edmond Malaise. From the wilderness of Kamchatka to the loneliness of the Swedish isle he calls home, Sjöberg revels in the wonder of the natural world and leaves behind a trail of memorable images and stories. From the Hardcover edition.


Filthy Rich

Filename: filthy-rich.pdf
ISBN: 9780316362450
Release Date: 2016-10-10
Number of pages: 320
Author: James Patterson
Publisher: Little, Brown

Download and read online Filthy Rich in PDF and EPUB A shocking true crime tale of money, power, and sex from the world's most popular thriller writer. Jeffrey Epstein rose from humble origins to the rarefied heights of New York City's financial elite. A college dropout with an instinct for numbers--and for people--Epstein amassed his wealth through a combination of access and skill. But even after he had it all, Epstein wanted more. And that unceasing desire--especially a taste for young girls--resulted in his stunning fall from grace. From Epstein himself, to the girls he employed as masseuses at his home, to the cops investigating the appalling charges against him, FILTHY RICH examines all sides of a case that scandalized one of America's richest communities. An explosive true story, FILTHY RICH is a riveting account of wealth, power and the influence they bring to bear on the American justice system.


In the Light of the Garden

Filename: in-the-light-of-the-garden.pdf
ISBN: 1503941140
Release Date: 2017-01-10
Number of pages:
Author: Heather Burch
Publisher: Lake Union Publishing

Download and read online In the Light of the Garden in PDF and EPUB