Reputation and Power

Filename: reputation-and-power.pdf
ISBN: 1400835119
Release Date: 2014-04-24
Number of pages: 856
Author: Daniel Carpenter
Publisher: Princeton University Press

Download and read online Reputation and Power in PDF and EPUB The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is the most powerful regulatory agency in the world. How did the FDA become so influential? And how exactly does it wield its extraordinary power? Reputation and Power traces the history of FDA regulation of pharmaceuticals, revealing how the agency's organizational reputation has been the primary source of its power, yet also one of its ultimate constraints. Daniel Carpenter describes how the FDA cultivated a reputation for competence and vigilance throughout the last century, and how this organizational image has enabled the agency to regulate an industry as powerful as American pharmaceuticals while resisting efforts to curb its own authority. Carpenter explains how the FDA's reputation and power have played out among committees in Congress, and with drug companies, advocacy groups, the media, research hospitals and universities, and governments in Europe and India. He shows how FDA regulatory power has influenced the way that business, medicine, and science are conducted in the United States and worldwide. Along the way, Carpenter offers new insights into the therapeutic revolution of the 1940s and 1950s; the 1980s AIDS crisis; the advent of oral contraceptives and cancer chemotherapy; the rise of antiregulatory conservatism; and the FDA's waning influence in drug regulation today. Reputation and Power demonstrates how reputation shapes the power and behavior of government agencies, and sheds new light on how that power is used and contested.


Building the Judiciary

Filename: building-the-judiciary.pdf
ISBN: 9781400842575
Release Date: 2012-03-25
Number of pages: 328
Author: Justin Crowe
Publisher: Princeton University Press

Download and read online Building the Judiciary in PDF and EPUB How did the federal judiciary transcend early limitations to become a powerful institution of American governance? How did the Supreme Court move from political irrelevance to political centrality? Building the Judiciary uncovers the causes and consequences of judicial institution-building in the United States from the commencement of the new government in 1789 through the close of the twentieth century. Explaining why and how the federal judiciary became an independent, autonomous, and powerful political institution, Justin Crowe moves away from the notion that the judiciary is exceptional in the scheme of American politics, illustrating instead how it is subject to the same architectonic politics as other political institutions. Arguing that judicial institution-building is fundamentally based on a series of contested questions regarding institutional design and delegation, Crowe develops a theory to explain why political actors seek to build the judiciary and the conditions under which they are successful. He both demonstrates how the motivations of institution-builders ranged from substantive policy to partisan and electoral politics to judicial performance, and details how reform was often provoked by substantial changes in the political universe or transformational entrepreneurship by political leaders. Embedding case studies of landmark institution-building episodes within a contextual understanding of each era under consideration, Crowe presents a historically rich narrative that offers analytically grounded explanations for why judicial institution-building was pursued, how it was accomplished, and what--in the broader scheme of American constitutional democracy--it achieved.


When Movements Anchor Parties

Filename: when-movements-anchor-parties.pdf
ISBN: 9781400873838
Release Date: 2015-09-01
Number of pages: 288
Author: Daniel Schlozman
Publisher: Princeton University Press

Download and read online When Movements Anchor Parties in PDF and EPUB Throughout American history, some social movements, such as organized labor and the Christian Right, have forged influential alliances with political parties, while others, such as the antiwar movement, have not. When Movements Anchor Parties provides a bold new interpretation of American electoral history by examining five prominent movements and their relationships with political parties. Taking readers from the Civil War to today, Daniel Schlozman shows how two powerful alliances—those of organized labor and Democrats in the New Deal, and the Christian Right and Republicans since the 1970s—have defined the basic priorities of parties and shaped the available alternatives in national politics. He traces how they diverged sharply from three other major social movements that failed to establish a place inside political parties—the abolitionists following the Civil War, the Populists in the 1890s, and the antiwar movement in the 1960s and 1970s. Moving beyond a view of political parties simply as collections of groups vying for preeminence, Schlozman explores how would-be influencers gain influence—or do not. He reveals how movements join with parties only when the alliance is beneficial to parties, and how alliance exacts a high price from movements. Their sweeping visions give way to compromise and partial victories. Yet as Schlozman demonstrates, it is well worth paying the price as movements reorient parties' priorities. Timely and compelling, When Movements Anchor Parties demonstrates how alliances have transformed American political parties.


Wireless Computing in Medicine

Filename: wireless-computing-in-medicine.pdf
ISBN: 9781118993590
Release Date: 2016-07-05
Number of pages: 668
Author: Mary Mehrnoosh Eshaghian-Wilner
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

Download and read online Wireless Computing in Medicine in PDF and EPUB Provides a comprehensive overview of wireless computing in medicine, with technological, medical, and legal advances This book brings together the latest work of leading scientists in the disciplines of Computing, Medicine, and Law, in the field of Wireless Health. The book is organized into three main sections. The first section discusses the use of distributed computing in medicine. It concentrates on methods for treating chronic diseases and cognitive disabilities like Alzheimer’s, Autism, etc. It also discusses how to improve portability and accuracy of monitoring instruments and reduce the redundancy of data. It emphasizes the privacy and security of using such devices. The role of mobile sensing, wireless power and Markov decision process in distributed computing is also examined. The second section covers nanomedicine and discusses how the drug delivery strategies for chronic diseases can be efficiently improved by Nanotechnology enabled materials and devices such as MENs and Nanorobots. The authors will also explain how to use DNA computation in medicine, model brain disorders and detect bio-markers using nanotechnology. The third section will focus on the legal and privacy issues and how to implement these technologies in a way that is a safe and ethical. Defines the technologies of distributed wireless health, from software that runs cloud computing data centers, to the technologies that allow new sensors to work Explains the applications of nanotechnologies to prevent, diagnose, and cure disease Includes case studies on how the technologies covered in the book are being implemented in the medical field, through both the creation of new medical applications and their integration into current systems Discusses pervasive computing’s organizational benefits to hospitals and health care organizations, and their ethical and legal challenges Wireless Computing in Medicine: From Nano to Cloud with Its Ethical and Legal Implications is written as a reference for computer engineers working in wireless computing, as well as medical and legal professionals. The book will also serve students in the fields of advanced computing, nanomedicine, health informatics, and technology law. Dr. Mary Mehrnoosh Eshaghian-Wilner, Esq. is an interdisciplinary scientist and patent attorney. She received a B.S. degree in Biomedical and Electrical Engineering (1985), M.S. degree in Computer Engineering (1985), Engineers degree in Electrical Engineering (1988), and Ph.D. in Computer Engineering (1988), all from the University of Southern California (USC). She holds a J.D. degree from the Northwestern California School of Law, and has graduated Cum Laude with an LL.M. degree from the Thomas Jefferson School of Law. Professor Eshaghian-Wilner is currently a Professor of Engineering Practice at the Electrical Engineering Department of USC. She is best known for her work in the areas of Optical Computing, Heterogeneous Computing, and Nanocomputing. Her current research involves the applications and implications of these and other emerging technologies in medicine and law. Professor Eshaghian-Wilner has founded and/or chaired numerous IEEE conferences and organizations, and serves on the editorial board of several journals. She is the recipient of several prestigious awards, and has authored and/or edited hundreds of publications, including three books.


Looking for Rights in All the Wrong Places

Filename: looking-for-rights-in-all-the-wrong-places.pdf
ISBN: 9780691155784
Release Date: 2013
Number of pages: 234
Author: Emily J. Zackin
Publisher: Princeton University Press

Download and read online Looking for Rights in All the Wrong Places in PDF and EPUB Unlike many national constitutions, which contain explicit positive rights to such things as education, a living wage, and a healthful environment, the U.S. Bill of Rights appears to contain only a long list of prohibitions on government. American constitutional rights, we are often told, protect people only from an overbearing government, but give no explicit guarantees of governmental help. Looking for Rights in All the Wrong Places argues that we have fundamentally misunderstood the American rights tradition. The United States actually has a long history of enshrining positive rights in its constitutional law, but these rights have been overlooked simply because they are not in the federal Constitution. Emily Zackin shows how they instead have been included in America's state constitutions, in large part because state governments, not the federal government, have long been primarily responsible for crafting American social policy. Although state constitutions, seemingly mired in trivial detail, can look like pale imitations of their federal counterpart, they have been sites of serious debate, reflect national concerns, and enshrine choices about fundamental values. Zackin looks in depth at the history of education, labor, and environmental reform, explaining why America's activists targeted state constitutions in their struggles for government protection from the hazards of life under capitalism. Shedding much-needed light on the variety of reasons that activists pursued the creation of new state-level rights, Looking for Rights in All the Wrong Places challenges us to rethink our most basic assumptions about the American constitutional tradition.


Three Worlds of Relief

Filename: three-worlds-of-relief.pdf
ISBN: 9781400842582
Release Date: 2012-04-29
Number of pages: 416
Author: Cybelle Fox
Publisher: Princeton University Press

Download and read online Three Worlds of Relief in PDF and EPUB Three Worlds of Relief examines the role of race and immigration in the development of the American social welfare system by comparing how blacks, Mexicans, and European immigrants were treated by welfare policies during the Progressive Era and the New Deal. Taking readers from the turn of the twentieth century to the dark days of the Depression, Cybelle Fox finds that, despite rampant nativism, European immigrants received generous access to social welfare programs. The communities in which they lived invested heavily in relief. Social workers protected them from snooping immigration agents, and ensured that noncitizenship and illegal status did not prevent them from receiving the assistance they needed. But that same helping hand was not extended to Mexicans and blacks. Fox reveals, for example, how blacks were relegated to racist and degrading public assistance programs, while Mexicans who asked for assistance were deported with the help of the very social workers they turned to for aid. Drawing on a wealth of archival evidence, Fox paints a riveting portrait of how race, labor, and politics combined to create three starkly different worlds of relief. She debunks the myth that white America's immigrant ancestors pulled themselves up by their bootstraps, unlike immigrants and minorities today. Three Worlds of Relief challenges us to reconsider not only the historical record but also the implications of our past on contemporary debates about race, immigration, and the American welfare state.


Electing the Senate

Filename: electing-the-senate.pdf
ISBN: 9781400852680
Release Date: 2014-12-21
Number of pages: 256
Author: Wendy J. Schiller
Publisher: Princeton University Press

Download and read online Electing the Senate in PDF and EPUB From 1789 to 1913, U.S. senators were not directly elected by the people—instead the Constitution mandated that they be chosen by state legislators. This radically changed in 1913, when the Seventeenth Amendment to the Constitution was ratified, giving the public a direct vote. Electing the Senate investigates the electoral connections among constituents, state legislators, political parties, and U.S. senators during the age of indirect elections. Wendy Schiller and Charles Stewart find that even though parties controlled the partisan affiliation of the winning candidate for Senate, they had much less control over the universe of candidates who competed for votes in Senate elections and the parties did not always succeed in resolving internal conflict among their rank and file. Party politics, money, and personal ambition dominated the election process, in a system originally designed to insulate the Senate from public pressure. Electing the Senate uses an original data set of all the roll call votes cast by state legislators for U.S. senators from 1871 to 1913 and all state legislators who served during this time. Newspaper and biographical accounts uncover vivid stories of the political maneuvering, corruption, and partisanship—played out by elite political actors, from elected officials, to party machine bosses, to wealthy business owners—that dominated the indirect Senate elections process. Electing the Senate raises important questions about the effectiveness of Constitutional reforms, such as the Seventeenth Amendment, that promised to produce a more responsive and accountable government.


Racial Realignment

Filename: racial-realignment.pdf
ISBN: 9781400880973
Release Date: 2016-04-26
Number of pages: 384
Author: Eric Schickler
Publisher: Princeton University Press

Download and read online Racial Realignment in PDF and EPUB Few transformations in American politics have been as important as the integration of African Americans into the Democratic Party and the Republican embrace of racial policy conservatism. The story of this partisan realignment on race is often told as one in which political elites—such as Lyndon Johnson and Barry Goldwater—set in motion a dramatic and sudden reshuffling of party positioning on racial issues during the 1960s. Racial Realignment instead argues that top party leaders were actually among the last to move, and that their choices were dictated by changes that had already occurred beneath them. Drawing upon rich data sources and original historical research, Eric Schickler shows that the two parties' transformation on civil rights took place gradually over decades. Schickler reveals that Democratic partisanship, economic liberalism, and support for civil rights had crystallized in public opinion, state parties, and Congress by the mid-1940s. This trend was propelled forward by the incorporation of African Americans and the pro-civil-rights Congress of Industrial Organizations into the Democratic coalition. Meanwhile, Republican partisanship became aligned with economic and racial conservatism. Scrambling to maintain existing power bases, national party elites refused to acknowledge these changes for as long as they could, but the civil rights movement finally forced them to choose where their respective parties would stand. Presenting original ideas about political change, Racial Realignment sheds new light on twentieth and twenty-first century racial politics.


Fighting for the Speakership

Filename: fighting-for-the-speakership.pdf
ISBN: 9780691156446
Release Date: 2012-10-22
Number of pages: 476
Author: Jeffery A. Jenkins
Publisher: Princeton University Press

Download and read online Fighting for the Speakership in PDF and EPUB The Speaker of the House of Representatives is the most powerful partisan figure in the contemporary U.S. Congress. How this came to be, and how the majority party in the House has made control of the speakership a routine matter, is far from straightforward. Fighting for the Speakership provides a comprehensive history of how Speakers have been elected in the U.S. House since 1789, arguing that the organizational politics of these elections were critical to the construction of mass political parties in America and laid the groundwork for the role they play in setting the agenda of Congress today. Jeffery Jenkins and Charles Stewart show how the speakership began as a relatively weak office, and how votes for Speaker prior to the Civil War often favored regional interests over party loyalty. While struggle, contention, and deadlock over House organization were common in the antebellum era, such instability vanished with the outbreak of war, as the majority party became an "organizational cartel" capable of controlling with certainty the selection of the Speaker and other key House officers. This organizational cartel has survived Gilded Age partisan strife, Progressive Era challenge, and conservative coalition politics to guide speakership elections through the present day. Fighting for the Speakership reveals how struggles over House organization prior to the Civil War were among the most consequential turning points in American political history.


Pharmaceutical Freedom

Filename: pharmaceutical-freedom.pdf
ISBN: 9780190684556
Release Date: 2017-07-03
Number of pages: 288
Author: Jessica Flanigan
Publisher: Oxford University Press

Download and read online Pharmaceutical Freedom in PDF and EPUB If a competent adult refuses medical treatment, physicians and public officials must respect her decision. Coercive medical paternalism is a clear violation of the doctrine of informed consent, which protects patients' rights to make medical decisions even if a patient's choice endangers her health. The same reasons for rejecting medical paternalism in the doctor's office are also reasons to reject medical paternalism at the pharmacy, yet coercive medical paternalism persists in the form of premarket approval policies and prescription requirements for pharmaceuticals. In Pharmaceutical Freedom Jessica Flanigan defends patients' rights of self-medication. Flanigan argues that public officials should certify drugs instead of enforcing prohibitive pharmaceutical policies that disrespect people's rights to make intimate medical decisions and prevent patients from accessing potentially beneficial new therapies. This argument has revisionary implications for important and timely debates about medical paternalism, recreational drug legalization, human enhancement, prescription drug prices, physician assisted suicide, and pharmaceutical marketing. The need for reform is especially urgent as medical treatment becomes increasingly personalized and patients advocate for the right to try. The doctrine of informed consent revolutionized medicine in the twentieth century by empowering patients to make treatment decisions. Rights of self-medication are the next step.


Building an American Empire

Filename: building-an-american-empire.pdf
ISBN: 9781400885350
Release Date: 2017-05-02
Number of pages: 312
Author: Paul Frymer
Publisher: Princeton University Press

Download and read online Building an American Empire in PDF and EPUB How American westward expansion was governmentally engineered to promote the formation of a white settler nation Westward expansion of the United States is most conventionally remembered for rugged individualism, geographic isolationism, and a fair amount of luck. Yet the establishment of the forty-eight contiguous states was hardly a foregone conclusion, and the federal government played a critical role in its success. This book examines the politics of American expansion, showing how the government's regulation of population movements on the frontier, both settlement and removal, advanced national aspirations for empire and promoted the formation of a white settler nation. Building an American Empire details how a government that struggled to exercise plenary power used federal land policy to assert authority over the direction of expansion by engineering the pace and patterns of settlement and to control the movement of populations. At times, the government mobilized populations for compact settlement in strategically important areas of the frontier; at other times, policies were designed to actively restrain settler populations in order to prevent violence, international conflict, and breakaway states. Paul Frymer examines how these settlement patterns helped construct a dominant racial vision for America by incentivizing and directing the movement of white European settlers onto indigenous and diversely populated lands. These efforts were hardly seamless, and Frymer pays close attention to the failures as well, from the lack of further expansion into Latin America to the defeat of the black colonization movement. Building an American Empire reveals the lasting and profound significance government settlement policies had for the nation, both for establishing America as dominantly white and for restricting broader aspirations for empire in lands that could not be so racially engineered.


Still a House Divided

Filename: still-a-house-divided.pdf
ISBN: 9781400839766
Release Date: 2011-08-22
Number of pages: 392
Author: Desmond S. King
Publisher: Princeton University Press

Download and read online Still a House Divided in PDF and EPUB Why have American policies failed to reduce the racial inequalities still pervasive throughout the nation? Has President Barack Obama defined new political approaches to race that might spur unity and progress? Still a House Divided examines the enduring divisions of American racial politics and how these conflicts have been shaped by distinct political alliances and their competing race policies. Combining deep historical knowledge with a detailed exploration of such issues as housing, employment, criminal justice, multiracial census categories, immigration, voting in majority-minority districts, and school vouchers, Desmond King and Rogers Smith assess the significance of President Obama's election to the White House and the prospects for achieving constructive racial policies for America's future. Offering a fresh perspective on the networks of governing institutions, political groups, and political actors that influence the structure of American racial politics, King and Smith identify three distinct periods of opposing racial policy coalitions in American history. The authors investigate how today's alliances pit color-blind and race-conscious approaches against one another, contributing to political polarization and distorted policymaking. Contending that President Obama has so far inadequately confronted partisan divisions over race, the authors call for all sides to recognize the need for a balance of policy measures if America is to ever cease being a nation divided. Presenting a powerful account of American political alliances and their contending racial agendas, Still a House Divided sheds light on a policy path vital to the country's future.


Preventing Regulatory Capture

Filename: preventing-regulatory-capture.pdf
ISBN: 9781107036086
Release Date: 2013-10-21
Number of pages: 501
Author: Daniel Carpenter
Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Download and read online Preventing Regulatory Capture in PDF and EPUB Leading scholars from across the social sciences present empirical evidence that the obstacle of regulatory capture is more surmountable than previously thought.


The Forging of Bureaucratic Autonomy

Filename: the-forging-of-bureaucratic-autonomy.pdf
ISBN: 0691070105
Release Date: 2001
Number of pages: 479
Author: Daniel P. Carpenter
Publisher: Princeton University Press

Download and read online The Forging of Bureaucratic Autonomy in PDF and EPUB Until now political scientists have devoted little attention to the origins of American bureaucracy and the relationship between bureaucratic and interest group politics. In this pioneering book, Daniel Carpenter contributes to our understanding of institutions by presenting a unified study of bureaucratic autonomy in democratic regimes. He focuses on the emergence of bureaucratic policy innovation in the United States during the Progressive Era, asking why the Post Office Department and the Department of Agriculture became politically independent authors of new policy and why the Interior Department did not. To explain these developments, Carpenter offers a new theory of bureaucratic autonomy grounded in organization theory, rational choice models, and network concepts. According to the author, bureaucracies with unique goals achieve autonomy when their middle-level officials establish reputations among diverse coalitions for effectively providing unique services. These coalitions enable agencies to resist political control and make it costly for politicians to ignore the agencies' ideas. Carpenter assesses his argument through a highly innovative combination of historical narratives, statistical analyses, counterfactuals, and carefully structured policy comparisons. Along the way, he reinterprets the rise of national food and drug regulation, Comstockery and the Progressive anti-vice movement, the emergence of American conservation policy, the ascent of the farm lobby, the creation of postal savings banks and free rural mail delivery, and even the congressional Cannon Revolt of 1910.


The Many Faces of Corruption

Filename: the-many-faces-of-corruption.pdf
ISBN: 0821367269
Release Date: 2007-04-04
Number of pages: 480
Author: J. Edgardo Campos
Publisher: World Bank Publications

Download and read online The Many Faces of Corruption in PDF and EPUB Corruption... How can policymakers and practitioners better comprehend the many forms and shapes that this socialpandemic takes? From the delivery of essential drugs, the reduction in teacher absenteeism, the containment of illegal logging, the construction of roads, the provision of water andelectricity, the international trade in oil and gas, the conduct of public budgeting and procurement, and the management of public revenues, corruption shows its many faces. 'The Many Faces of Corruption' attempts to bring greater clarity to the often murky manifestations of this virulent and debilitating social disease. It explores the use of prototype road maps to identify corruption vulnerabilities, suggests corresponding 'warning signals,' and proposes operationally useful remedial measures in each of several selected sectors and for a selected sampleof cross cutting public sector functions that are particularlyprone to corruption and that are critical to sector performance.Numerous technical experts have come together in this effort to develop an operationally useful approach to diagnosing and tackling corruption. 'The Many Faces of Corruption' is an invaluable reference for policymakers, practitioners, andresearchers engaged in the business of development.