Lone Star Stalag

Filename: lone-star-stalag.pdf
ISBN: 9781603445535
Release Date: 2006
Number of pages: 285
Author: Michael R. Waters
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

Download and read online Lone Star Stalag in PDF and EPUB Annotation Between 1943 and 1945 nearly fifty thousand German Prisoners of war, mostly from the German Afrika Korps, lives and worked at seventy POW camps across Texas. Camp Hearne, located on the outskirts of rural Hearne, Texas, was one of the first and largest German prisoner-of-war camps in the United States. Waters and his research teams tell the story of the five thousand German soldiers held there during World War II. The book reveals the shadow world of Nazism that existed in the camp, adding darkness to a story that is otherwise optimistic and in places humorous.


The Lone Star and the Swastika

Filename: the-lone-star-and-the-swastika.pdf
ISBN: WISC:89077939452
Release Date: 2001
Number of pages: 260
Author: Richard Paul Walker
Publisher:

Download and read online The Lone Star and the Swastika in PDF and EPUB Soon after the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941, prisoner of war camps were being planned and developed in the United States. The U.S. Army was faced with the difficult assignment of finding locations for such camps, constructing the buildings, staffing the sites, and establishing military policies that followed the strictures of the Geneva Convention. Many of the POW camps were located in Texas, some the result of active campaigning by citizens to have camps built nearby for economic reasons. This analysis of the Texas camps not only describes the logistics of holding thousands of captured German (and some Japanese and Italian) soldiers until World War II's end, but also offers an evaluation of the army's role in carrying out their assignment. The author has extensively considered all facets of the POW program in Texas: how camps were selected and constructed, how prisoners were treated, what routine camp life was like, what problems arose with pro-Nazi prisoners, and how civilians reacted to having 50,000 enemy prisoners in their state.


Crossing the Zorn

Filename: crossing-the-zorn.pdf
ISBN: 9780786456789
Release Date: 2010-01-06
Number of pages: 222
Author: Edward Monroe-Jones
Publisher: McFarland

Download and read online Crossing the Zorn in PDF and EPUB Conceived in desperation after the Battle of the Bulge in January 1945, Germany’s Operation Nordwind culminated in the frozen Alsatian fields surrounding the Zorn River. In what was expected to be an easy offensive, the German 10th Waffen SS Panzer Division attacked the American 12th Armored Division near the villages of Herrlisheim and Weyersheim. Neither army foresaw the savage violence that ensued. Combining the vivid eyewitness accounts of veterans from both sides of the conflict with information gleaned from a variety of long-unavailable print sources, this richly detailed history casts a fascinating light on a little-known but crucial battle in the Second World War. Common stalwart German and American soldiers carried out near-impossible orders.


The Enemy Within Never Did Without

Filename: the-enemy-within-never-did-without.pdf
ISBN: STANFORD:36105212823723
Release Date: 2015
Number of pages: 232
Author: Jeffrey L. Littlejohn
Publisher:

Download and read online The Enemy Within Never Did Without in PDF and EPUB Camp Huntsville was one of the first and largest POW camps constructed in America during World War II. Located roughly eight miles east of Huntsville, Texas, in Walker County, the camp was built in 1942 and opened for prisoners the following year. The camp served as a model site for POW installations across the country and set a high standard for the treatment of prisoners. Between 1943 and 1945, the camp housed roughly 4,700 German POWs and experienced tense relations between incarcerated Nazi and anti-Nazi factions. Then, during the last months of the war, the American military selected Camp Huntsville as the home of its top-secret re-education program for Japanese POWs. The irony of teaching Japanese prisoners about democracy and voting rights was not lost on African Americans in East Texas who faced disenfranchisement and racial segregation. Nevertheless, the camp did inspire some Japanese prisoners to support democratization of their home country when they returned to Japan after the war. Meanwhile, in this country, the US government sold Camp Huntsville to Sam Houston State Teachers College in 1946, and the site served as the school's Country Campus through the mid-1950s. "This long-overdue project is one I started working on decades ago but didn't finish. It is gratifying to see the book come to fruition through the efforts of these two history professors. And what a job they've done!"--Paul Ruffin, Director, TRP


Mobilizing the Home Front

Filename: mobilizing-the-home-front.pdf
ISBN: 1585444855
Release Date: 2006-04-04
Number of pages: 200
Author: James J. Kimble
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

Download and read online Mobilizing the Home Front in PDF and EPUB Kimble examines the U.S. Treasury’s eight war bond drives that raised over $185 billion—the largest single domestic propaganda campaign known to that time. The campaign enlisted such figures as Judy Garland, Norman Rockwell, Irving Berlin, and Donald Duck to cultivate national morale and convince Americans to buy war bonds.


Mr Polk s Army

Filename: mr-polk-s-army.pdf
ISBN: 1585441627
Release Date: 2001-05-01
Number of pages: 288
Author: Richard Bruce Winders
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

Download and read online Mr Polk s Army in PDF and EPUB A study of the American military experience in the Mexican War. Drawing on diaries, journals and reminiscences, it: presents the daily life of soldiers at war; links the army to the society that produced it; and concludes that American participants in the Mexican War shared a common experience.


Americans All

Filename: americans-all.pdf
ISBN: 1603441328
Release Date: 2008-11
Number of pages: 214
Author: Nancy Gentile Ford
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

Download and read online Americans All in PDF and EPUB During the First World War, nearly half a million immigrant draftees from forty-six different nations served in the U.S. Army. This surge of Old World soldiers challenged the American military's cultural, linguistic, and religious traditions and required military leaders to reconsider their training methods for the foreign-born troops. How did the U.S. War Department integrate this diverse group into a united fighting force? The war department drew on the experiences of progressive social welfare reformers, who worked with immigrants in urban settlement houses, and they listened to industrial efficiency experts, who connected combat performance to morale and personnel management. Perhaps most significantly, the military enlisted the help of ethnic community leaders, who assisted in training, socializing, and Americanizing immigrant troops and who pressured the military to recognize and meet the important cultural and religious needs of the ethnic soldiers. These community leaders negotiated the Americanization process by promoting patriotism and loyalty to the United States while retaining key ethnic cultural traditions. Offering an exciting look at an unexplored area of military history, Americans All! Foreign-born Soldiers in World War I constitutes a work of special interest to scholars in the fields of military history, sociology, and ethnic studies. Ford's research illuminates what it meant for the U.S. military to reexamine early twentieth-century nativism; instead of forcing soldiers into a melting pot, war department policies created an atmosphere that made both American and ethnic pride acceptable. During the war, a German officer commented on the ethnic diversity of the American army and noted, with some amazement, that these "semi-Americans" considered themselves to be "true-born sons of their adopted country." The officer was wrong on one count. The immigrant soldiers were not "semi-Americans"; they were "Americans all!"


How War Began

Filename: how-war-began.pdf
ISBN: 1585443301
Release Date: 2004-11-10
Number of pages: 292
Author: Keith F. Otterbein
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

Download and read online How War Began in PDF and EPUB Have humans always fought and killed each other, or did they peacefully coexist until states developed? Is war an expression of human nature or an artifact of civilization? Questions about the origin and inherent motivations of warfare have long engaged philosophers, ethicists, anthropologists as they speculate on the nature of human existence. In How War Began, author Keith F. Otterbein draws on primate behavior research, archaeological research, data gathered from the Human Relations Area Files, and a career spent in research and reflection on war to argue for two separate origins. He identifies two types of military organization: one which developed two million years ago at the dawn of humankind, wherever groups of hunters met, and a second which developed some five thousand years ago, in four identifiable regions, when the first states arose and proceeded to embark upon military conquests. In carefully selected detail, Otterbein marshals the evidence for his case that warfare was possible and likely among early Homo sapiens. He argues from analogy with other primates, from Paleolithic rock art depicting wounded humans, and from rare skeletal remains with embedded weapon points to conclude that warfare existed and reached a peak in big game hunting societies. As the big game disappeared, so did warfare—only to reemerge once agricultural societies achieved a degree of political complexity that allowed the development of professional military organizations. Otterbein concludes his survey with an analysis of how despotism in both ancient and modern states spawns warfare. A definitive resource for anthropologists, social scientists and historians, How War Began is written for all who are interested in warfare and individuals who seek to understand the past and the present of humankind.


Colt Terry Green Beret

Filename: colt-terry-green-beret.pdf
ISBN: 9781603446068
Release Date: 2005
Number of pages: 236
Author: Charles D. Patton
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

Download and read online Colt Terry Green Beret in PDF and EPUB Through one man's career, "Colt Terry, Green Beret" portrays the birth and development of America's most elite fighting unit. The 10th Special Forces Group was the first of the Green Beret units.


Hart s War

Filename: hart-s-war.pdf
ISBN: 0345455843
Release Date: 2002-01-29
Number of pages: 576
Author: John Katzenbach
Publisher: Ballantine Books

Download and read online Hart s War in PDF and EPUB Second Lieutenant Tommy Hart, a navigator whose B-25 was shot out of the sky in 1942, is burdened with guilt as the only surviving member of his crew. Now he is just another POW at the fiercely guarded Stalag Luft 13 in Bavaria. Then routine comes to a halt with the arrival of a new prisoner: First Lieutenant Lincoln Scott, an African American Tuskegee airman who instantly becomes the target of contempt from his fellow soldiers. When a prisoner is brutally murdered, and all the blood-soaked evidence points to Scott, Hart is tapped to defend the soldier. In a trial rife with racial tension and raw conflict, where the lines between ally and enemy blur, there are those with their own secret motives, and a burning passion for a rush to judgment, no matter what the cost. From the Paperback edition.


Hell in An Loc

Filename: hell-in-an-loc.pdf
ISBN: 9781574412765
Release Date: 2009
Number of pages: 282
Author: Quang Thi Lâm
Publisher: University of North Texas Press

Download and read online Hell in An Loc in PDF and EPUB "Three days before Easter last spring, the North Vietnamese struck South Vietnam with a fury unknown to the Vietnam war since the Tet offensive four years earlier. They poured south across the DMZ, smashed into the central highland from Laos, crossed the border from Cambodia and, with an army of 36,000 men and 100 Russian-made tanks, raced toward Saigon, boasting that they'd be in the city by May 19, Ho Chi Minh's birthday. From one end of the country to the other, bases and villages fell before the savagery of their onslaught. By April 5, all that blocked them from Saigon was a ragtag band of 6,800 South Vietnamese regulars and militiamen and a handful of American advisors holed up in An Loc, a once-prosperous rubber-plantation town of 15,000 astride Highway 13, which led to the capital, 60 miles to the south ... In Thi's opinion, reporting the victory of An Loc would contradict the U.S. media's basic premise that the war could not be won because ARVN was a corrupt and ineffective force. Subsequent published studies of the conflict provide a wealth of details about the use of U.S. airpower and the role of the U.S. advisors, but they fail to provide equal coverage to the activities and performance of ARVN units participating in the siege. Thi believes that it is time to set the record straight. Without denying the tremendous contribution of the U.S. advisors and pilots to the success of An Loc, this book is written primarily to tell the South Vietnamese side of the story and, more importantly, to render justice to the South Vietnamese soldier who withstood ninety-four days of horror and prevailed"--Publisher's website.


Prisoner of the Rising Sun

Filename: prisoner-of-the-rising-sun.pdf
ISBN: 9781603445573
Release Date: 2006
Number of pages: 272
Author: John M. Beebe
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

Download and read online Prisoner of the Rising Sun in PDF and EPUB Beebe's diary reveals the experiences of an American officer as a prisoner of the Japanese after being captured on Corregidor. His account offers insight into the treatment accorded to officers and shows how the Corregidor prisoners fared compared with the ill-fated Bataan captives. Beebe's writings describe life in captivity, from poor rations and field work in camps in the Philippines, Taiwan, and Manchuria, to POW concerts and Red Cross visits.


Danger Close

Filename: danger-close.pdf
ISBN: 9781603443043
Release Date: 2010-01-15
Number of pages: 250
Author: Steve Call
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

Download and read online Danger Close in PDF and EPUB “America had a secret weapon,” writes Steve Call of the period immediately following September 11, 2001, as planners contemplated the invasion of Afghanistan. This weapon consisted of small teams of Special Forces operatives trained in close air support (CAS) who, in cooperation with the loose federation of Afghan rebels opposed to the Taliban regime, soon began achieving impressive—and unexpected—military victories over Taliban forces and the al-Qaeda terrorists they had sponsored. The astounding success of CAS tactics coupled with ground operations in Afghanistan soon drew the attention of military decision makers and would eventually factor into the planning for another campaign: Operation Iraqi Freedom. But who, exactly, are these air power experts and what is the function of the TACPs (Tactical Air Control Parties) in which they operate? Danger Close provides a fascinating look at a dedicated, courageous, innovative, and often misunderstood and misused group of military professionals. Drawing on the gripping first-hand accounts of their battlefield experiences, Steve Call allows the TACPs to speak for themselves. He accompanies their narratives with informed analysis of the development of CAS strategy, including potentially controversial aspects of the interservice rivalries between the air force and the army which have at times complicated and even obstructed the optimal employment of TACP assets. Danger Close makes clear, however, that the systematic coordination of air power and ground forces played an invaluable supporting role in the initial military victories in both Afghanistan and Iraq. This first-ever examination of the intense, life-and-death world of the close air support specialist will introduce readers to a crucial but little-known aspect of contemporary warfare and add a needed chapter in American military history studies.


Service

Filename: service.pdf
ISBN: 031618537X
Release Date: 2014-05-27
Number of pages: 416
Author: Marcus Luttrell
Publisher: Back Bay Books

Download and read online Service in PDF and EPUB Navy SEAL Marcus Luttrell returned from his star-crossed mission in Afghanistan with his bones shattered and his heart broken. So many had given their lives to save him-and he would have readily done the same for them. As he recuperated, he wondered why he and others, from America's founding to today, had been willing to sacrifice everything-including themselves-for the sake of family, nation, and freedom. In Service, we follow Marcus Luttrell to Iraq, where he returns to the battlefield as a member of SEAL Team 5 to help take on the most dangerous city in the world: Ramadi, the capital of war-torn Al Anbar Province. There, in six months of high-intensity urban combat, he would be part of what has been called the greatest victory in the history of U.S. Special Operations forces. We also return to Afghanistan and Operation Redwing, where Luttrell offers powerful new details about his miraculous rescue. Throughout, he reflects on what it really means to take on a higher calling, about the men he's seen lose their lives for their country, and the legacy of those who came and bled before. A thrilling war story, Service is also a profoundly moving tribute to the warrior brotherhood, to the belief that nobody goes it alone, and no one will be left behind. Navy SEAL Marcus Luttrell returned from his star-crossed mission in Afghanistan with his bones shattered and his heart broken. So many had given their lives to save him-and he would have readily done the same for them. As he recuperated, he wondered why he and others, from America's founding to today, had been willing to sacrifice everything-including themselves-for the sake of family, nation, and freedom. In Service, we follow Marcus Luttrell to Iraq, where he returns to the battlefield as a member of SEAL Team 5 to help take on the most dangerous city in the world: Ramadi, the capital of war-torn Al Anbar Province. There, in six months of high-intensity urban combat, he would be part of what has been called the greatest victory in the history of U.S. Special Operations forces. We also return to Afghanistan and Operation Redwing, where Luttrell offers powerful new details about his miraculous rescue. Throughout, he reflects on what it really means to take on a higher calling, about the men he's seen lose their lives for their country, and the legacy of those who came and bled before. A thrilling war story, Service is also a profoundly moving tribute to the warrior brotherhood, to the belief that nobody goes it alone, and no one will be left behind.


Historical Archaeology of Military Sites

Filename: historical-archaeology-of-military-sites.pdf
ISBN: 9781603443104
Release Date: 2010
Number of pages: 281
Author: Clarence R. Geier
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

Download and read online Historical Archaeology of Military Sites in PDF and EPUB