Lone Star Nation How Texas Will Transform America

Filename: lone-star-nation-how-texas-will-transform-america.pdf
ISBN: 9781605987149
Release Date: 2014-11-04
Number of pages: 352
Author: Richard Parker
Publisher: Pegasus Books

Download and read online Lone Star Nation How Texas Will Transform America in PDF and EPUB A provocative and eye-opening look at the most explosive and controversial state in America, where everything is bigger, bolder—and shaping our nation's future in surprising ways To most Americans, Texas has been that love-it-or-hate it slice of the country that has sparked controversy, bred presidents, and fomented turmoil from the American Civil War to George W. Bush. But that Texas is changing—and it will change America itself. Richard Parker takes the reader on a tour across today's booming Texas, an evolving landscape that is densely urban, overwhelmingly Hispanic, exceedingly powerful in the global economy, and increasingly liberal. This Texas will have to ensure upward mobility, reinvigorate democratic rights, and confront climate change—just to continue its historic economic boom. This is not the Texas of George W. Bush or Rick Perry. Instead, this is a Texas that will remake the American experience in the twenty-first century—as California did in the twentieth—with surprising economic, political, and social consequences. Along the way, Parker analyzes the powerful, interviews the insightful, and tells the story of everyday people because, after all, one in ten Americans in this century will call Texas something else: Home.


Lone Star Nation

Filename: lone-star-nation.pdf
ISBN: 1605989061
Release Date: 2015-11-15
Number of pages: 352
Author: Richard Parker
Publisher:

Download and read online Lone Star Nation in PDF and EPUB Examines the evolution of Texas as the largest state in the union becomes increasingly urban, Hispanic and liberal and highlights the individual stories of average people who are helping to change and shape its future. 10,000 first printing.


Big Hot Cheap and Right

Filename: big-hot-cheap-and-right.pdf
ISBN: 9781610391931
Release Date: 2013-04-09
Number of pages: 288
Author: Erica Grieder
Publisher: Hachette UK

Download and read online Big Hot Cheap and Right in PDF and EPUB Texas may well be America's most controversial state. Evangelicals dominate the halls of power, millions of its people live in poverty, and its death row is the busiest in the country. Skeptical outsiders have found much to be offended by in the state's politics and attitude. And yet, according to journalist (and Texan) Erica Grieder, the United States has a great deal to learn from Texas. In Big, Hot, Cheap, and Right, Grieder traces the political history of a state that was always larger than life. From its rowdy beginnings, Texas has combined a long-standing suspicion of government intrusion with a passion for business. Looking to the present, Greider assesses the unique mix of policies on issues like immigration, debt, taxes, regulation, and energy, which together have sparked a bonafide Texas Miracle of job growth. While acknowledging that it still has plenty of twenty-first-century problems to face, she finds in Texas a model of governance whose power has been drastically underestimated. Her book is a fascinating exploration of America's underrated powerhouse.


Clandestine Crossings

Filename: clandestine-crossings.pdf
ISBN: 0801475899
Release Date: 2009
Number of pages: 298
Author: David Spener
Publisher: Cornell University Press

Download and read online Clandestine Crossings in PDF and EPUB Clandestine Crossings delivers an in-depth description and analysis of the experiences of working-class Mexican migrants at the beginning of the twenty-first century as they enter the United States surreptitiously with the help of paid guides known as coyotes. Drawing on ethnographic observations of crossing conditions in the borderlands of South Texas, as well as interviews with migrants, coyotes, and border officials, Spener details how migrants and coyotes work together to evade apprehension by U.S. law enforcement authorities as they cross the border. In so doing, he seeks to dispel many of the myths that misinform public debate about undocumented immigration to the United States. The hiring of a coyote, Spener argues, is one of the principal strategies that Mexican migrants have developed in response to intensified U.S. border enforcement. Although this strategy is typically portrayed in the press as a sinister organized-crime phenomenon, Spener argues that it is better understood as the resistance of working-class Mexicans to an economic model and set of immigration policies in North America that increasingly resemble an apartheid system. In the absence of adequate employment opportunities in Mexico and legal mechanisms for them to work in the United States, migrants and coyotes draw on their social connections and cultural knowledge to stage successful border crossings in spite of the ever greater dangers placed in their path by government authorities.


The Train to Crystal City

Filename: the-train-to-crystal-city.pdf
ISBN: 9781451693683
Release Date: 2015-01-20
Number of pages: 416
Author: Jan Jarboe Russell
Publisher: Simon and Schuster

Download and read online The Train to Crystal City in PDF and EPUB The New York Times bestselling dramatic and never-before-told story of a secret FDR-approved American internment camp in Texas during World War II: “A must-read….The Train to Crystal City is compelling, thought-provoking, and impossible to put down” (Star-Tribune, Minneapolis). During World War II, trains delivered thousands of civilians from the United States and Latin America to Crystal City, Texas. The trains carried Japanese, German, and Italian immigrants and their American-born children. The only family internment camp during the war, Crystal City was the center of a government prisoner exchange program called “quiet passage.” Hundreds of prisoners in Crystal City were exchanged for other more ostensibly important Americans—diplomats, businessmen, soldiers, and missionaries—behind enemy lines in Japan and Germany. “In this quietly moving book” (The Boston Globe), Jan Jarboe Russell focuses on two American-born teenage girls, uncovering the details of their years spent in the camp; the struggles of their fathers; their families’ subsequent journeys to war-devastated Germany and Japan; and their years-long attempt to survive and return to the United States, transformed from incarcerated enemies to American loyalists. Their stories of day-to-day life at the camp, from the ten-foot high security fence to the armed guards, daily roll call, and censored mail, have never been told. Combining big-picture World War II history with a little-known event in American history, The Train to Crystal City reveals the war-time hysteria against the Japanese and Germans in America, the secrets of FDR’s tactics to rescue high-profile POWs in Germany and Japan, and above all, “is about identity, allegiance, and home, and the difficulty of determining the loyalties that lie in individual human hearts” (Texas Observer).


Lone Star Politics

Filename: lone-star-politics.pdf
ISBN: 9781483352787
Release Date: 2014-12-31
Number of pages: 592
Author: Ken Collier
Publisher: CQ Press

Download and read online Lone Star Politics in PDF and EPUB Lone Star Politics, by Ken Collier, Steven Galatas, and Julie Harrelson-Stephens, delves into Texas’s rich political tradition, exploring how myth often clashes with the reality of modern governance. The new Fourth Edition is thoroughly updated, and includes expanded coverage of federalism, Rick Perry’s legacy as governor, the impact of the state’s growing diversity on political participation and behavior, and important policy discussion around fracking, education reforms, and immigration. New full-page infographics visually capture a chapter’s key concepts, making the abstract understandable and comparisons easy.


The Autobiography of an Execution

Filename: the-autobiography-of-an-execution.pdf
ISBN: 9780446573948
Release Date: 2010-02-03
Number of pages: 288
Author: David R. Dow
Publisher: Twelve

Download and read online The Autobiography of an Execution in PDF and EPUB Near the beginning of The Autobiography of an Execution, David Dow lays his cards on the table. "People think that because I am against the death penalty and don't think people should be executed, that I forgive those people for what they did. Well, it isn't my place to forgive people, and if it were, I probably wouldn't. I'm a judgmental and not very forgiving guy. Just ask my wife." It this spellbinding true crime narrative, Dow takes us inside of prisons, inside the complicated minds of judges, inside execution-administration chambers, into the lives of death row inmates (some shown to be innocent, others not) and even into his own home--where the toll of working on these gnarled and difficult cases is perhaps inevitably paid. He sheds insight onto unexpected phenomena-- how even religious lawyer and justices can evince deep rooted support for putting criminals to death-- and makes palpable the suspense that clings to every word and action when human lives hang in the balance.


Dr Mutter s Marvels

Filename: dr-mutter-s-marvels.pdf
ISBN: 9780698162105
Release Date: 2014-09-04
Number of pages: 384
Author: Cristin O'Keefe Aptowicz
Publisher: Penguin

Download and read online Dr Mutter s Marvels in PDF and EPUB A mesmerizing biography of the brilliant and eccentric medical innovator who revolutionized American surgery and founded the country’s most famous museum of medical oddities Imagine undergoing an operation without anesthesia performed by a surgeon who refuses to sterilize his tools—or even wash his hands. This was the world of medicine when Thomas Dent Mütter began his trailblazing career as a plastic surgeon in Philadelphia during the middle of the nineteenth century. Although he died at just forty-eight, Mütter was an audacious medical innovator who pioneered the use of ether as anesthesia, the sterilization of surgical tools, and a compassion-based vision for helping the severely deformed, which clashed spectacularly with the sentiments of his time. Brilliant, outspoken, and brazenly handsome, Mütter was flamboyant in every aspect of his life. He wore pink silk suits to perform surgery, added an umlaut to his last name just because he could, and amassed an immense collection of medical oddities that would later form the basis of Philadelphia’s Mütter Museum. Award-winning writer Cristin O’Keefe Aptowicz vividly chronicles how Mütter’s efforts helped establish Philadelphia as a global mecca for medical innovation—despite intense resistance from his numerous rivals. (Foremost among them: Charles D. Meigs, an influential obstetrician who loathed Mütter’s "overly" modern medical opinions.) In the narrative spirit of The Devil in the White City, Dr. Mütter’s Marvels interweaves an eye-opening portrait of nineteenth-century medicine with the riveting biography of a man once described as the "P. T. Barnum of the surgery room."


Seeds of Empire

Filename: seeds-of-empire.pdf
ISBN: 9781469624259
Release Date: 2015-08-06
Number of pages: 368
Author: Andrew J. Torget
Publisher: UNC Press Books

Download and read online Seeds of Empire in PDF and EPUB By the late 1810s, a global revolution in cotton had remade the U.S.-Mexico border, bringing wealth and waves of Americans to the Gulf Coast while also devastating the lives and villages of Mexicans in Texas. In response, Mexico threw open its northern territories to American farmers in hopes that cotton could bring prosperity to the region. Thousands of Anglo-Americans poured into Texas, but their insistence that slavery accompany them sparked pitched battles across Mexico. An extraordinary alliance of Anglos and Mexicans in Texas came together to defend slavery against abolitionists in the Mexican government, beginning a series of fights that culminated in the Texas Revolution. In the aftermath, Anglo-Americans rebuilt the Texas borderlands into the most unlikely creation: the first fully committed slaveholders' republic in North America. Seeds of Empire tells the remarkable story of how the cotton revolution of the early nineteenth century transformed northeastern Mexico into the western edge of the United States, and how the rise and spectacular collapse of the Republic of Texas as a nation built on cotton and slavery proved to be a blueprint for the Confederacy of the 1860s.


Lone Star Tarnished

Filename: lone-star-tarnished.pdf
ISBN: 9780415808767
Release Date: 2012
Number of pages: 285
Author: Calvin C. Jillson
Publisher: Routledge

Download and read online Lone Star Tarnished in PDF and EPUB Texas pride, like everything else in the state, is larger than life. So, too, perhaps, are the state's challenges. Lone Star Tarnished approaches public policy in the nation's most populous "red state" from historical, comparative, and critical perspectives. The historical perspective provides the scope for asking how various policy domains have developed in Texas history, regularly reaching back to the state's founding and with substantial data for the period 1950 to the present. In each chapter, Cal Jillson compares Texas public policy choices and results with those of other states and the United States in general. Finally, the critical perspective allows us to question the balance of benefits and costs attendant to what is often referred to as "the Texas way" or "the Texas model." Jillson delves deeply into seven substantive policy chapters, covering the most important policy areas in which state governments are active. Through his lively and lucid prose, students are well equipped to analyze how Texas has done and is doing compared to selected states and the national average over time and today. Readers will also come away with the necessary tools to assess the many claims of Texas's exceptionalism.


The Texas Left

Filename: the-texas-left.pdf
ISBN: 9781603441896
Release Date: 2010-02-05
Number of pages: 243
Author: David O'Donald Cullen
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

Download and read online The Texas Left in PDF and EPUB The Texas Left. Some would say the phrase is an oxymoron. For most of the twentieth century, the popular perception of Texas politics has been that of dominant conservatism, punctuated by images of cowboys, oil barons, and party bosses intent on preserving a decidedly capitalist status quo. In fact, poor farmers and laborers who were disenfranchised, segregated, and, depending on their ethnicity and gender, confronted with varying levels of hostility and discrimination, have long composed the "other" political heritage of Texas. In The Texas Left, fourteen scholars examine this heritage. Though largely ignored by historians of previous decades who focused instead on telling the stories of the Alamo, the Civil War, the cattle drives, and the oilfield wildcatters, this parallel narrative of those who sought to resist repression reveals themes important to the unfolding history of Texas and the Southwest. Volume editors David O'Donald Cullen and Kyle G. Wilkison have assembled a collection of pioneering studies that provide the broad outlines for future research on liberal and radical social and political causes in the state and region. Among the topics explored in this book are early efforts of women, blacks, Tejanos, labor organizers, and political activists to claim rights of citizenship, livelihood, and recognition, from the Reconstruction era until recent times.


Lone Star Rising

Filename: lone-star-rising.pdf
ISBN: 0195054350
Release Date: 1991
Number of pages: 721
Author: Robert Dallek
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

Download and read online Lone Star Rising in PDF and EPUB Discusses the contradictions of Johnson's early life and career, including his years as congressman, senator, and majority leader


Texas Politics Today 2015 2016 Edition

Filename: texas-politics-today-2015-2016-edition.pdf
ISBN: 9781305537392
Release Date: 2015-01-01
Number of pages: 416
Author: William Earl Maxwell
Publisher: Cengage Learning

Download and read online Texas Politics Today 2015 2016 Edition in PDF and EPUB TEXAS POLITICS TODAY encourages critical thinking and civic participation with ideas, essays, and questions related to Texas politics, presented from different viewpoints. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.


From South Texas to the Nation

Filename: from-south-texas-to-the-nation.pdf
ISBN: 9781469625249
Release Date: 2015-08-25
Number of pages: 336
Author: John Weber
Publisher: UNC Press Books

Download and read online From South Texas to the Nation in PDF and EPUB In the early years of the twentieth century, newcomer farmers and migrant Mexicans forged a new world in South Texas. In just a decade, this vast region, previously considered too isolated and desolate for large-scale agriculture, became one of the United States' most lucrative farming regions and one of its worst places to work. By encouraging mass migration from Mexico, paying low wages, selectively enforcing immigration restrictions, toppling older political arrangements, and periodically immobilizing the workforce, growers created a system of labor controls unique in its levels of exploitation. Ethnic Mexican residents of South Texas fought back by organizing and by leaving, migrating to destinations around the United States where employers eagerly hired them--and continued to exploit them. In From South Texas to the Nation, John Weber reinterprets the United States' record on human and labor rights. This important book illuminates the way in which South Texas pioneered the low-wage, insecure, migration-dependent labor system on which so many industries continue to depend.


Lone Star America

Filename: lone-star-america.pdf
ISBN: 9781621572312
Release Date: 2014-07-21
Number of pages: 258
Author: Mark Davis
Publisher: Regnery Publishing

Download and read online Lone Star America in PDF and EPUB Throughout America and around the world, the United States has been known as a beacon of hope and opportunity, the land of the free and the home of the brave. Sadly, from the crumbling urban ghetto of Detroit to the cash-strapped shores of California to the rust belt of the Midwest, America is not living up to that promise. Except in Texas. While unemployment soars elsewhere, Texans are hard at work. While small businesses across the country are going under, Texas' entrepreneurs are thriving. While large companies are being squeezed by taxes, regulations and unions, more and more corporations are moving to Texas to grow and expand. While people of faith are ridiculed and marginalized in most cities on both coasts, in Texas churches and synagogues are bursting at the seams. How did Texas embrace what the rest of America seems to have forgotten? In Lonestar America, popular talk radio show host Mark Davis presents a powerful case for economic prosperity, individual freedom, strong families, and even stronger pride of place – alive and kicking in Texas, and easily exportable to the rest of America. Davis shows how Texas has done it, how some “honorary Texans” in other states (governors and even local communities) have adopted some of the same policies and approaches, and how states across the country can reclaim the promise of the American dream.